Doc and Fluff: A Dystopian Tale of a Girl and Her Biker

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An Excerpt (Chapter 20) of Doc and Fluff by Patrick Califia, read by Hyena

Written in the early nineties but set in the apocalyptic future, Doc encounters Fluff in a bathroom of the home base of the Alamo Angels biker gang. Together they kick start a chase up the West Coast,  leaving destruction and mayhem in their wake. The pair winds up in the slums of  Portland, where they settle in with a community of sex workers and dykes. This is where we meet them in  chapter 20, as Doc and Fluff’s relationship continues its downward slide. read more

Treacherous Women: Kaneko Fumiko by Helene Bowen Raddeker

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Pak Yeol (left) and Fumiko (right) being lewd in the courtroom

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I don’t know where to start describing my relationship Kaneko Fumiko.

Fumiko was a nihilist during in early 1920’s Japan. She grew up unwanted and abused – her parents never registered her when she was born, meaning she didn’t legally exist for the first half of her life. Her dad abandoned her; her mom tried to sell her into prostitution; she ended up in Korea as a child servant working for her colonizer grandparents. She dropped out of school to hang out with some anarchists, publish some radical magazines and found the Futeisha (translated as “The Malcontent’s Society,” which was basically just her and her nihilist friends hanging out). Then she was arrested for  trying to blow up the emperor, and killed herself in prison at the ripe old age of 23 in a joyous affirmation of her power over her own life. read more

Bloodchild by Octavia butler

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Octavia Butler describes herself as “a forty-seven-year-old writer who
can remember being a ten-year-old  writer and who expects someday to
be an eighty-year-old writer… a hermit, a pessimist if I’m not
careful, a  feminist, a Black, a former Baptist, an oil-and-water
combination of  ambition, laziness, insecurity, certainty, and drive”.
She started writing science fiction at 12 because she thought men were
doing a terrible job, and she could do better. In her work, it’s
apparent she believed humanity was inherently flawed and doomed to
destroy itself. I get sad about her early death and miss her a lot. read more