FRR Books Podcast Episode 4: The Silence of the Animals by John Gray

The sands are frantic Image result for john gray silence of the animals

In the hourglass.  But there is time

To change, to utterly destroy

That too-familiar image

Lurking in the glass,

Each morning at the edge of the mirror

The writing and thinking of John Gray is a gift to those of us who have endured a life full of others’ ideals, moralities, and rules driven into us. John Gray relentlessly questions and troubles the narratives of progress and social betterment that run through society largely unquestioned, even in radical circles. The idea of transforming or evolving the world and the individuals within it into “something better” is a plague that has stricken the best of us. Once I am able to shed myself of this sickness of narcissism and self loathing (for there is always a flaw in the human to be fixed) then something resembling an authentic life could begin to be imagined. This life looks like raw possibility, what has been written before as the creative nothing. From this voidal abyss grows my life free of all the baggage that I have been born with, for I had no say in the size and shape of my body, the place of my origin or the monsters who parented me, whether they be at our homes or in our schools. While I may never be able to shed these skins completely, what is my life if not an attempt to metamorphose myself in each moment. Ursula Le Guinn once wrote that “what is most changeable is fullest of eternity” and what is a human life if not the search for eternity. Eternity is gained from ecstasy, from the moments that defy time, society, and reality. John Gray has gifted you and I with a chance for more of these moments, and we would be fools not to listen. read more

FRR Mockcasts 2: The Brilliant

The goal of this podcast is total absurdity.  In this podcast we discuss anti-fascism, freedom, and have a special advertisement for the LBC internship program!  Enjoy!

FRR Books Podcast Episode 3: The Trial by Franz Kafka

Image result for kafka man at desk the trial

The Trial by Franz Kafka displays the life of Joseph K, a bank employee and supposedly good citizen of a society in which there is universal peace. The novel begins abruptly when K is delivered an indictment by three strangers who despite their civilian attire are said to be official warders. Though there is no clarity as to what the charge is, K accepts his proceeding as a personal project or obsession which from then on consumes his reality. His social life becomes a montage of witnesses, corroborators, defendants and testimonies regarding his arrest while authority is an undercurrent driven by everyone and no one. By the essence of its own inertia, K’s world is a banal confinement, a moral prison illuminated by his allegation. read more

Off The Leash: Iconoclastic & Anti-Social Words

There are innumerable splits between “anarchists.”  Some disagree about economics, strategies of resistance, and a seemingly infinite number of isms.  I find the most important split to be between social and anti-social.  What need is there for social and anti-social anarchists to “work together.”  This is something I just don’t understand.  Anyone who seeks to build a new mass society is someone I have a fundamental and irreparable split with…in essence, we are enemies.  People who believe that everyone is an anarchist are my enemies. People who can look at history and see progress towards freedom or compassion or social change that is desirable are my enemies.  People who see human nature as freedom loving are my enemies.  I see a few who burn with the desire for an ephemeral freedom and a huge majority of people who are not only willing but eager to submit themselves to society, a cause,  a partner.  People who refuse to acknowledge that slaves(including me and most reading this) are responsible for their condition, are my enemies.  My enemies are the existing and the existent.  As an anti-social anarchist I find myself constantly surrounded by my own enemies.  Friends are difficult to find, harder to keep, and a rare find for one who chooses freedom as value. read more

They Who Marry Do Ill by Voltairine De Cleyre

“So much as I have been able to put together the pieces of the universe in my small head, there is no absolute right or wrong; there is only a relativity, depending on the consciously though very slowly altering condition of a social race in respect to the rest of the world. Right and wrong are social conceptions: mind, I do not say human conceptions. The names “right” and “wrong,” truly, are of human invention only; but the conception “right” and “wrong,” dimly or clearly, has been wrought out with more or less effectiveness by all intelligent social beings. And the definition of Right, as sealed and approved by the successful conduct of social beings, is: That mode of behavior which best serves the growing need of that society.” read more

LEAVE ME ALONE: Misanthropic Writings From the Anti-Social Edge


I once got into an argument at the anarchist study group in Berkeley, CA about where our anarchy came from.  As I usually do, I loudly proclaimed that all anarchy means to me is “No!” and nothing else.  To some at the group, this seemed an immature and childish sentiment, reminiscent of Crimethinc. and reeking of anti-intellectualism.  Some shared their displeasure at this claim of mine, while some sat silently, as they usually do at the study group, being voyeurs, being takers, giving none of their energy or effort and absorbing(or not) the work others do in attempting to explain their thoughts and feelings. read more

FRR Books Podcast #1: The Festival of Insignificance by Milan Kundera


This is the first episode of FRR’s new books podcast.  Our goal is to discuss books(mostly fiction), especially where they intersect with our lives, nihilism, and anarchism.  I(rydra) will be the most consistent host with a rotation of friends and others I find interesting broadcasting when we desire to.  In this episode we discuss Milan Kundera’s final novel, “The Festival of Insignificance.”  I began reading Kundera as a teenager and my fondness for him has only grown as I have slowly felt the effects of his writing, ideas, and brilliance sink into me over the years. read more

ITS Communiques #3+4

We continue with our Individualists Tending Toward The Wild recording series with communiques 3 and 4.


From the fourth:

… in the past three communiques we have developed a critique of nanotechnology and information technology, of industrial society and have set forth an analysis of the ecological consequences of greater demands for contributions in the field of science and Technology; now we turn to break down the consequences of all this within the human mind, our approach as ITS, and the rejection of some terms that do not seem to identify us, simply in order to clarify our position. read more