My Intercourse! How We Have it, Who We Do it With: FRR Books Podcast the Stirner Series Episode VII

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In episode VII of the Stirner Series we cover the second 50 pages of the chapter My Intercourse. In this episode Keehar, Big Cat, and rydra wrong discuss all things Stirner. We delve deeper into Stirner’s ideas and how they relate to our own lives. Some people have wondered what the purpose of this project is. The answer is simple: we are a group of friends who enjoy reading, talking, fighting, and laughing about books we like. If that isn’t of interest to you, then we probably wouldn’t get along very well if we met in the meat space. We do this project for ourselves, but we share it for our glory and because fuck, why not! read more

FRR Books Podcast Episode 6: The Unique and Its Property, A Close Reading

In episode 6 rydra, big cat, Kahar, and Chuck discuss many things!

  • What is the difference between a criminal and an illegalist
  • Liberals want us to assert our weakness!
  • Might vs Right! Earned vs Taken rights! Rights?!
  • Can egoism be appropriated by leftism!?
  • Rydra says we cannot have a creative nothing because we cannot free ourselves from other’s perceptions of us! He shockingly uses Kundera to back up this point in a discussion of imagologues.
  • What is spookier, society or other people?
  • Big Cat brings in Daredevil references using Fisk to back her up to discuss love as the ultimate prison, “everywhere you go, you take it with you.” Aw, Fisk!
  • We discuss Steve Prefontaine and the perfect speech for an egoist to give leading up to a first kiss! We miss you Steve!
  • Big Cat explains Crab in A Bucket Theory
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    FRR Books Podcast: The Unique and Its Property by Max Stirner, a Close Reading Part 5!


    Welcome to episode 5 of the FRR Books Podcast series on Max Stirner’s The Unique and its Property translated by Wolif Landstreicher.  In this podcast we cover section 2.1 Ownness and stop at section 2.2.1 My Power

    This episode is hosted by Kahar, John, Big Cat, Chuck and rydra wrong. We are back on the sea packed 5 deep like sardines on the FRR sailboat.

    Discussed in this episode:

  •  What is the difference between freedom and ownness
  • Does Stirner hate freedom! It has nothing for you!  What does that mean? Can he let go !?
  • Freedom apparently meanings being “rid of things”
  • Occupy Stirner! What the fuck
  • We discuss how our dating lives are relevant to Stirner, are they?
  • Does consent matter when it comes to ownership and property(in the Stirnerian sense)?
  • Take when you want and throw away the rest:  Is this just a cliche or actually useful
  • Concepts! What the fuck is a concept! How do we use them
  • Who does Stirner give the status of capital B Being to ?
  • Can a slave be inwardly free? Is this trivial?
  • Stirner says there is freedom and unfreedom! No such thing as half way crooks! But is he just creating a binary of freedom and unfreedom to destroy the concept! woooooah
  • Chuck says romantic relationships are being trained to treasures!  Benefits vs a chain!
  • John says chosen bondage is freedom, like being in a dungeon! We discuss!
  • What the fuck is Stirner’s problems with rocks.  Rydra fights with Stirner in a landslide of discontent.  Also panpsychism is so last year.
  • Kahar likes his Christians out of the closet, he is pleased!
  • Kahar and Big Cat argue over Kahar’s belief that selves can be divided into parts
  • Impulses and desires and relationship to Taoism
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    FRR Books Podcast: The Unique and Its Property by Max Stirner, a Close Reading Part 4

    Welcome to episode 4 of the FRR Books Podcast series on Max Stirner’s The Unique and its Property translated by Wolif Landstreicher.  In this podcast we cover section 2.1 and stop at section 2.2.1 My Power

    This episode is hosted by Kahar, John, and rydra wrong.  This is our first go recording podcasts at sea!  We are floating on water as we speak!

    Discussed in this episode:

    –  Criticism as thought, the downside of criticism

    –  The 3 types of liberalism

    –  Human rights!

    –  rydra hates phenomenology and wants to fight about it!

    –  morality and stirner

    –  what is religion?

    –  Conflict avoidance and how to avoid it!

    –  Cult of celebrity and “Absolute Monarchy”

    –  Stirner crushes Social Justice

    –  Is Stirner related to Nietzsche?

    This podcast was produced by rydra wrong

    This podcast was edited by Big Cat

     

    FRR Books Podcast: The Unique and Its Property by Max Stirner, a Close Reading Part 3

    Welcome to episode 3 of the FRR Books Podcast series on Max Stirner’s The Unique and its Property translated by Wolif Landstreicher.  In this podcast we cover section 1.3 The Free.  This episode is hosted by Cornelius, Chuck, and rydra wrong.

    Discussed in this episode:

  • How do we eat the profane?  What have we held sacred that we no longer do?
  • Fear!  How do we develop an intimate relationship with fear! Another excuse to talk about surfing!
  • Talk of shit!  Another excuse for rydra to bring up Kundera
  • Talk of Christianity being spread among the non-secular
  • Dissolution of the object and the flavors of abstraction! There are many to choose from!
  • We are in a sea of phenomenology says Cornelius!
  • Children!  Talk of Kids!
  • Chuck says part of humanity is thinking of yourself in relation to an ideal human, we discuss this!
  • Cornelius feels limited by society, even suffocated but she remains more interested in the physiology and bacteria living within human beings!
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    FRR Books Podcast: The Unique and Its Property by Max Stirner, a close reading Part 2

    
    Welcome to episode 2 of the FRR Books Podcast series on Max Stirner’s The Unique and its Property translated by Wolif Landstreicher.  In this podcast we cover section 1.2.3 The Hierarchy, completing section 1.2, stopping just before section 1.3 The Free.

    In this episode we discuss:

  • What is a fixed idea?  Can we be free of fixed ideas
  • Is Kahar a nihilist? Is Stirner a nihilist?  Can Kahar defend nihilism against Rydra’s devilish advocacy
  • Can we actually abandon objective morality
  • Ethics as a semantic and non-meaningful replacement of morality
  • What is a self?  Are our selves continuous, discontinuous, or something else
  • Nev always desires to be bad and that is kind of hotttt
  • We discuss essence and if we have an essence using Francis Bacon’s Scream painting and Milan Kundera’s thoughts on them
  • How hard is rydra’s solipsism? Can Kahar avoid being negated by it? Does he care or is he just a tentacle of rydra’s octopus.
  • Discussion of how we can trust another person with the context being them changing over time
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    FRR Books Podcast: The Unique and Its Property by Max Stirner, a close reading Part 1

    This podcast covers the translator’s introduction and stops at section 1.2 Human Beings of Ancient and Modern Times.

    The book can be read online here:  https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/max-stirner-the-unique-and-its-property

    The book can be obtained here:  http://littleblackcart.com/books/anarchy/the-unique-and-its-property-en/

    FRR is expanding our scope by attempting a larger project.  Instead of doing one podcast on a book we are doing a slow/deep/close reading of Wolfi Landstreicher’s translation of The Unique and Its Property by Max Stirner.  We attend a reading group together which is slowly working its way through the book, so every other week we will read a portion of Stirner, attend reading group, then record a podcast on the section we read and the thoughts and ideas that came up during reading group.  We will rotate different hosts through the series of podcasts.  We are doing this because we would love to have had this type of discussion available to us when reading some of the books that we love the most, so we are doing it ourselves.  We are also attempting to do a close reading which means to read something more than once, many times over, taking notes, discussing it, and engaging deeply with it.  Feel free to email us or comment on this page if you have thoughts/feelings/whatever about it!

    In Episode 1 we discuss the following:

  •   Is there an individual/self.  Stirner is not an individualist?  It is not an individualist book
  •   Relationship between Taoism and Stirner
  •   Can anyone actually be an egoist?
  •   Rydra strong arms the conversation and questions objective reality through Stirner
  •   Abritrary nature of values and a transient idea of an “I”
  •   Can nihilism/egoism be separated
  •   Talk of translation in general
  •   How do we apply the implications of this reading
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    FRR Books Podcast Episode 4: The Silence of the Animals by John Gray

     

    The sands are frantic Image result for john gray silence of the animals

    In the hourglass.  But there is time

    To change, to utterly destroy

    That too-familiar image

    Lurking in the glass,

    Each morning at the edge of the mirror

     

    The writing and thinking of John Gray is a gift to those of us who have endured a life full of others’ ideals, moralities, and rules driven into us. John Gray relentlessly questions and troubles the narratives of progress and social betterment that run through society largely unquestioned, even in radical circles. The idea of transforming or evolving the world and the individuals within it into “something better” is a plague that has stricken the best of us. Once I am able to shed myself of this sickness of narcissism and self loathing (for there is always a flaw in the human to be fixed) then something resembling an authentic life could begin to be imagined. This life looks like raw possibility, what has been written before as the creative nothing. From this voidal abyss grows my life free of all the baggage that I have been born with, for I had no say in the size and shape of my body, the place of my origin or the monsters who parented me, whether they be at our homes or in our schools. While I may never be able to shed these skins completely, what is my life if not an attempt to metamorphose myself in each moment. Ursula Le Guinn once wrote that “what is most changeable is fullest of eternity” and what is a human life if not the search for eternity. Eternity is gained from ecstasy, from the moments that defy time, society, and reality. John Gray has gifted you and I with a chance for more of these moments, and we would be fools not to listen.

    “What would you say to a man who, nodding his head sadly, remarked that ‘Fish are born to fly – but everywhere they swim!’?” read more

    FRR Mockcasts 2: The Brilliant

    The goal of this podcast is total absurdity.  In this podcast we discuss anti-fascism, freedom, and have a special advertisement for the LBC internship program!  Enjoy!

    FRR Books Podcast Episode 3: The Trial by Franz Kafka

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    The Trial by Franz Kafka displays the life of Joseph K, a bank employee and supposedly good citizen of a society in which there is universal peace. The novel begins abruptly when K is delivered an indictment by three strangers who despite their civilian attire are said to be official warders. Though there is no clarity as to what the charge is, K accepts his proceeding as a personal project or obsession which from then on consumes his reality. His social life becomes a montage of witnesses, corroborators, defendants and testimonies regarding his arrest while authority is an undercurrent driven by everyone and no one. By the essence of its own inertia, K’s world is a banal confinement, a moral prison illuminated by his allegation.

    Kafka’s society is a surreal bureaucracy upheld by each person’s commitment to their job and functions as psychological totalitarianism where morality seems to be the only consistent logic between characters. The few stories they share with one another are devoid of direct authenticity. Instead, their interactions and conversations are impersonal and only relate to the Law. Outside of trial affairs there is an unsettling atomization where no one is able to demonstrate emotional intelligence or any sort of skilled communication whatsoever. K’s desires creep dormantly and his interactions are tormented by a deeply frustrated inner monologue that isolates him from shared experiences. Though there is not an evident list of laws, there is a social conduct that the characters manage to abide by. They appear to embody an order in which the foundation has been long lost. It’s as if the timeworn relics of shame and guilt, which once were propagated by rules, are now all that remains. Remnants which become a new genesis for their decrepit choices and actions.

    Contained in every attic, behind every closed door, the trial accumulates out of reach from K. The superficial innocence he once upheld as a working citizen, a banker, is instantly tainted in becoming the accused. Though many others who are accused are able to drift in their cases for a long duration, K pleads for an immediate conclusion and his attempts at negotiating seduce his penalty nearer. He exists in a purgatory between the accusation and his defense until he ultimately conforms in death. A sentence that finalizes his erasure from the narrative of the trial, seemingly the only transformative act for someone with such scarce creativity.

    This is the slow, dystopian account of K’s adaptation to his surroundings, the demands of the social. Amidst the social there is the Trial, a hideousness which culls subjects to process, writhes and objectifies them, making an example that renews the logic of civility. From my experience, personal ideas or skills that have the potential to benefit my individuality often draw me in toward groups, crowds or “anarchist milieus”, becoming nothing more than the bait which ensnares me to yet another trial. No matter how interesting, stimulating or supportive their company may appear to be on the outside, their establishment merely enables inner tribunals. I leave those scenes with a Kafka line in mind, “The court wants nothing from you. It receives you when you come and dismisses you when you go.”

    Is the most common, parasitic compulsion which keeps so many bound to slavery, to society, that of belonging? Living in a fixed place within the bleak conditions of modernity for months, years, a lifetime, makes adaptation especially imperative, inescapable even. When one pulls forth the will to change their surroundings, relocate, start new relationships, is it not only to re-adapt? If adaptation is the modification of individual and social activity in adjustment to cultural surroundings, then here lays the limitation of individual projectuality. By engaging with the social, there are agreements and rules that one is indebted to. This contract defines how one acts just as how language influences the seedling thought which emanates as speech. Therein, The Trial seems to be a parody of K’s inability to have agency within the narrative of a collective story. I too believe with Ibsen that the one who is most alone is the strongest one. To be alone is to demonstrate a rejected adaptation. After reading this book I am left wondering if it is K’s loneliness, sense of obligation, or fated circumstance that entangles him to the collective and initiates his metamorphosis from subject into object? The paper thin line that K straddles between living by his own volition and living by the expectations of others is a question which provokes the relentless search for new ways to navigate, new ways to live, as the Trial continually tries to enmesh us in its web.

     

    Written, Edited, and Produced by Big Cat

    Voiced by rydra wrong, Kahar, and Big Cat